House Sitting Myths

House sitting is becoming wildly popular. You’ve probably heard tons of great things about getting into house-sitting!

But you’ve probably also heard some house sitting myths as well!

How do you know what to believe? Is house sitting all it’s cracked up to be? Or is it too good to be true?

We’ll unpack some of the misconceptions about house sitting you’ve probably heard. Keep reading to learn more about house sitting.

Myth: House Sitting Is Dangerous

Different areas have different risks. People in high-crime neighborhoods may experience danger without ever leaving their own homes.

People who live in rural locations may deal with wild animals for the safety of their property.

House sitting will have the same risks as simply living in those areas.

You can decrease the risk by researching the locations ahead of time. There may be some homes you are uncomfortable going to. Then find a different home!

Staying at hotels while traveling also presents risks. As long as you know how to use common sense safety, you will be safe no matter where you stay while traveling.

Sites like Trusted House Sitters will also provide background checks and previous reviews. This means you will know more about security concerns.

Bad house-sitting experiences do exist, but professional house-sitters have generally positive experiences.

Myth: House Sitting Is Easy Money

House sitters will tell you that house sitting is not easy money.

While the tasks are pretty simple, they can be a lot of responsibility.

Also, the pay is not that great. While it is a good way to supplement your main job, it’s not usually enough to live on.

If you only need some extra money, this is a great way to earn it. But don’t expect to quit your job just because you start house-sitting!

Myth: House Sitting Is A Free Vacation

While house-sitting can make travel more affordable, it’s not quite that simple.

Yes, you save money on accommodation. Yes, you may even get paid to stay at a certain place.

However, you still have to work for it. Pet sitters need to care for pets and maintain the property.

While these responsibilities aren’t difficult, they can take away from exploring.

House sitters will still need to pay for transportation, food, and any activities.

Each day of house-sitting is full of important responsibilities. House-sitting travel is not for everyone.

Myth: You Can’t House Sit And Have A Full-Time Job

While it can be hard to house-sit if you have a 9-to-5, it’s not impossible.

You can still house-sit for a couple of days on the weekends or when you take your vacation time. You can even house-sit locally. This is especially true if you live in a big city, like San Francisco or New York.

Remote workers can house-sit full-time. Nomadic house sitters can sit anywhere with decent internet connection quality.

Some jobs may be easier to do while house sitting than others. However, it’s possible to do both.

Potential house sitters should consider the privilege of house sitting while working remotely.

Myth: You Can’t House Sit If You’re Allergic To Pets

While most house sitters double as pet sitters, that isn’t always the case. There are thousands of house sitting jobs without pets, you just need to know how to find them.

Many people hire house sitters even though they don’t have pets. This is becoming more popular as people with second homes like to have someone looking after the pool or garden, or even just to collect packages. If you follow the instructions on this post Ill show you how to use filters to find sits without certain types of animals or even no animals at all.

Myth: House Sitting Is Instant

It can take a while to build up a house-sitting business. While commercial house-sitting sites speed up the process, it’s not instant.

You need experience and reviews to get jobs. So it may be hard to get your first few gigs.

After a while, it becomes easier to get jobs. It may take a while to get started, but most successful house sitters say the wait is worth it.

With several months house sitting experience, you will start booking more frequent jobs. Current house sitters have slowly built up their portfolio and you can, too!

Myth: You Still Need A House Even If You House Sit

While it is nice to have a home base, it isn’t necessary. If you can live out of a few suitcases, you can just go from home to home.

You may need a permanent address, though. This is important for receiving mail or filling out paperwork.

Ask a friend or relative if you can use their address. You can even stay with them between house sits if you need to “go home” for a few days.

There may be times when you have a few days without a gig. You could go home, or just stay at a hotel with the money you’ve saved up.

If you travel with a partner, you could even “double-book” yourselves. For instance, one of you can go to the next house and sit a couple of days early while the other finishes up at the current one.

There may be overlap, but with two people, it’s doable. This makes it great for a retired couple or two besties who want to see the world!

Myth: House Sitting Is Like Getting A Vacation Home

While people use house-sitting to book lodging for vacation, it’s not that simple.

You can’t just say “I want to go to San Francisco the second week of July” and find a place to stay for free. You can look for a place to stay in San Francisco and alter your travel dates to fit the opportunity.

But you won’t be able to sleep there and then explore the day away. You will have duties and tasks throughout the week.

You may find that you have a favorite house to sit at. Maybe it’s a nice home, friendly owners, or a great location. Either way, with flexibility you can schedule your vacations around house-sitting gigs.

House-sitting travel isn’t for everyone. Fortunately, it works well for people with flexible lifestyles.

You should also remember that the houses aren’t always perfect. While it’s rare to sit in a filthy house, a lot of houses aren’t vacation home material.

Myth: House Sitters Need A Car

International house sitters can tell you that they don’t own a car. They may house-sit full-time across the world, so it’s not easy to bring a car.

However, there are times when you might need a car. If you stay at a home far away from public transportation, you will need a car.

Long-term house sitters should consider transportation before taking a job.

Fortunately, many homeowners will allow you to use their car if that’s the case. You can always check with them ahead of time.

If the homeowner doesn’t have a car for you to use, you can simply rent one while you stay there.

You can read comprehensive house-sitting guides to learn about becoming a long-term house-sitter. If you take care of house-sitting business, you’ll enjoy the privilege of house-sitting!

Professional house sitters use online house-sitting platforms to find opportunities and enjoy life. If it’s your mission in life to see the world, you should consider house-sitting travel.

Our best advice is to read factual reviews from long-term house sitters. They’ll share constructive situations and challenging moments.

They’ll also say that house-sitting travel is worth it. They wouldn’t even trade in the difficult moments and bad house stories.

Author: Britt

Hiya! I am Britt is one of the Travelling House Sitters. I have cared for 25 dogs, 35 cats 1 turtle, and 1 rabbit over 40+ houses in 15 countries over 5 years.

I am is ready to teach you exactly how to become a house sitter! I want everyone to enjoy this incredible lifestyle as well!

You can read more about about Jay and I here!

Or connect with me on Facebook or in our house sitting community on Facebook

House Sitting in Salon-de-Provence
Me (Britt) House Sitting in Salon-de-Provence, France

Leave a Comment

Your email address will not be published. Required fields are marked *